The Wavelength Stitch

Wavelength Stitch for SM

A perfect afghan stitch!

Fall is in full swing and that means many of us will be making afghans. How about this year we try something a little different?

The wavelength stitch, especially when paired with Bernat blanket yarn, makes a delightful afghan. The bulky yarn works up super fast and as you can see in the picture above, extra squishy. It is available in more than 20 colors so you are sure to find a combination to match your decor!

You can get really creative with color using this stitch. That’s one of my favorite things about it! I find that it looks great using the same accent color for the single crochet rows (shown in white above) and alternate the colors of the “wave” rows. In the picture above, you are looking at my wavelength afghan (pattern coming soon!). For this pattern I use white as my accent color, tan as my dominant color and alternate blue and orange for secondary colors.

The sky is the limit really!

Uses and Applications

Aside from afghans, the wavelength stitch is great for many projects. It is versatile enough to be incorporated into just about anything.

Use it in the round or by the row. Any way you decide to use it, the wavelength stitch will bring a delightful texture to your project.

I can see this stitch being used in many ways. For example, the wavelength stitch will be great for:

  • hats
  • scarves/cowls
  • afghans (of course)
  • wash cloths or towls
  • bags
  • legwarmers
  • wrist warmers

Before you get started

The wavelength stitch can be used for any weight yarn. In the picture above, I am using Bernat Blanket yarn, which isn’t exactly camera friendly. So for this tutorial I am demonstrating with another fantastic yarn, Lion Brand Heartland.

This shows just how versatile the wavelength stitch really is!

Wavelength Stitch Video Tutorial

 

This video is also available in a left handed version. Click here to be directed to the left handed tutorial on YouTube.


Written Instructions

The wavelength stitch must be worked in a multiple of 14 plus 2.

Abbreviations

  • Ch – Chain
  • Dc – Double crochet
  • Hdc – Half double crochet
  • Sc – Single crochet
  • Tc – Treble crochet

Foundation Row (accent color): Ch a multiple of 14 + 2 stitches. Sc in the second chain from the hook and in each remaining chain. Bind off accent color.

Row 1 (dominant color): Bind on and ch 1. Sc in the first two stitches, *hdc in the next two stitches, dc in the next two stitches, tc in the next three stitches, dc in the next two stitches, hdc in the next two stitches, sc in the next three stitches. Repeat from * until you have reached the end of the row. You should end with a sc in the last two stitches. Bind off dominant color.

Row 2 (accent color): Bind on accent color and ch 1. Sc in each stitch to end of row. Bind off accent color.

Row 3 (secondary color): Bind on secondary color and ch 3. Tc in the first stitch, *dc in the next two stitches, hdc in the next two stitches, sc in the next three stitches, hdc in the next two stitches, dc in the next two stitches, tc in the next three stitches. Repeat from * until you have reached the end of the row. You should end with a tc in the last two stitches. Bind off secondary color.

Row 4 (accent color): Bind on accent color and ch 1. Sc in each stitch to end of row. Bind off accent color.

Repeat rows 1-4 until your project has reached the desired length.

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