Ultimate Guide to Blocking

Blocking Web

Blocking: The Secret To Professional Looking Crochet

So many people ask me “Brittany, how do you get your crochet to look so neat?” Well my friends, I’m about to share my secret. Blocking.

Many of you have probably heard of the term blocking and for you, this post will be a nice refresher. For the rest of you who have never heard of blocking, you’re about to learn an incredible skill that will take your finished objects to the next level!

All About Blocking with Brittany

First things first, have a look at my blocking tutorial. Here, we will cover the three methods of blocking: wet, steam and finger blocking.



[divider]

Let’s Recap…

[alert-announce]Blocking is a technique used mainly on flat projects to relax your stitches and lock them into the perfect position. Make your  points sharper and your edges straighter with blocking![/alert-announce]

Method #1: Wet Blocking

Wet blocking is my personal method of choice. It takes quite a bit longer than the other two methods, but the extra time needed to air dry the project allows the stitches to relax longer and really stay put. To wet block your project:

  1. Pin your project to a blocking board (standard sewing pins do just fine) in the position you would like for it to stay.
  2. Saturate your project with a spray bottle and some tap water.
  3. Allow it to fully dry overnight before unpinning.

Are you ready for the cool part?

Blocking is NOT reversed with washing!!

That’s correct, I have experienced this first hand. I spent weeks blocking over 200 little granny squares for my scrapghan a couple of summers ago. Once finished, it desperately needed washing to soften up the harsh acrylics I used to bust my yarn stash. At the time, It was an experiment. I had no clue if the squares would revert back to their round-ish shape. So I tossed it in the wash and hung it to dry. To my surprise, the squares stayed in their blocked position! Now two years and a few more washes later, they are STILL square!

Tools Needed To Wet Block

There are only a few things you need to wet block:

  • blocking boards/athletic flooring tiles
  • sewing pins
  • spray bottle

Disclosure: Please note that the links below are affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you decide to purchase your supplies online. Please understand that I have experience with these products and I recommend them because I use them myself and highly recommend them, not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to buy them online. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them.

Purchase Your Supplies Online


Method #2: Steam Blocking

Steam blocking is the quicker alternative to wet blocking. In my experience, the results aren’t quite as good as wet blocking and a little more care must be used. However, steam blocking is still a great and effective method! To steam block your project:

  1. Pin your project to a blocking board (standard sewing pins do just fine) in the position you would like for it to stay.
  2. Using your iron on the steam setting, hover it at least 1 inch from your project and press the steam button several times, covering the entire project.
  3. Allow it to fully cool and dry before unpinning (usually about 15 minutes).

I think you’ll be surprised at how well steam blocking works. I know I was! The concept is the same, the stitches are being relaxed and fixed into the position you choose but heat is added to speed up the process.

I urge you to be very careful when steam blocking your projects!

Do NOT place your iron directly on your crochet, no matter what fiber content you’ve used. Acrylics will melt to your iron and animal fibers may begin to felt. Either way, this isn’t a good situation and your project may be ruined.



With that said, as long as you are careful, this is a completely safe method of blocking.

Tools Needed To Wet Block

There are only a few things you need to wet block:

  • blocking boards/athletic flooring tiles
  • sewing pins
  • iron with steam setting

Disclosure: Please note that the links below are affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you decide to purchase your supplies online. Please understand that I have experience with these products and I recommend them because I use them myself and highly recommend them, not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to buy them online. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them.

Purchase Your Supplies Online



Method #3: Finger Blocking

Finger blocking is a method I use most often for 3D objects such as flowers. Of the three methods, I use it the most however, the results aren’t very permanent. The good part…you only need your fingers and a few seconds to finger block.

[divider]

Bonus Tip!

Since filming the tutorial and writing this post, I have discovered a fourth method of blocking your project and this one would be great for flat pieces AND 3D! I have to give my husband credit for this one.

Our secret weapon?

Bonus Blocking Tip

Downy Wrinkle Releaser!

The block you see in the picture was first sprayed with downy wrinkle releaser and finger blocked into position. Once dried, it stayed!

You will notice a slight stiffness to the crochet once dried, but it’s nothing to be concerned about. So far I have only used this on acrylic fibers but will be exploring with animal fibers too. I’ll keep you posted!

Cheers for now,

Brittany copy



3 Reasons To Subscribe

  1. Free Stuff. You'll get instant access to free resources, including these printable gift tags!
  2. Content Tailored To You. Over time, I'll get to learn more about you and deliver content that actually matters.
  3. No Hype. Just real content that's meant to make a difference.
Powered by ConvertKit

Related Posts

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This