The Basics of Crocodile Stitch Increases in the Round

The Basics of Crocodile Stitch Increases in the Round

Have you ever wondered how to work crocodile stitch increases in the round?

It is possible – and it’s not as difficult as you might be thinking. If you’re comfortable with the crocodile stitch, you can certainly work crocodile stitch increases in the round!

I’ll preface this guide by saying there may be more than one way to work crocodile stitch increases in the round. That’s the case with many areas of crochet -there’s often more than one way to get the same result!

By the end of this post, you will have an understanding of how to work crocodile stitch increases, when and where they need to occur and what shape you get as a result of it.

How to Work Crocodile Stitch Increases in the Round

It’s simple to work crocodile stitch increases in the round if you know two important things:

  1. It’s not much different than increasing in the round with your more basic stitches (double crochet, half double and so on).
  2. You will always make your increases on the “foundation” rounds of your crocodile stitch pattern.
The Basics of Crocodile Stitch Increases in the Round

The scaled look you see in the crocodile stitch is the result of two basic rows/rounds: the foundation row/round (which is your double crochet framework) and the scale row/round.

If this is a new stitch to you, have a look at my beginner tutorial for how to work the crocodile stitch. That will give you the foundation you need to fully understand this guide.

To increase you will always make the following stitches in your “designated spot” (more on that in just a moment) – 2 double crochets, chain 2 and 2 double crochets – on a foundation round.

What I call the “designated spot” here and in the tutorial is the place where you work your stitches for the foundation rounds.

There are two designated spots:

  1. in the middle of the scale
  2. in between two scales

So when you want to make a crocodile stitch increase in the round, you will simply make two double crochets, chain two and two more double crochets all in the same location – either in the middle of the scale or in between two scales.

How do you know where to make these increases?

If you’re familiar with crocheting a basic circle, you’re a step ahead of the rest. If not, have a look at my Ultimate Guide to Crochet in the Round.

It’s a great skill to be very familiar with on your quest to be a better crocheter and it’s pretty useful to know when you want to make crocodile stitch increases in the round.

The basic rule for increasing is as follows:

  • increase every stitch on round 2
  • increase every other stitch on round 3
  • increase every third stitch on round 4
  • increase every fourth stitch on round 5
  • increase every fifth stitch on round 6

and so on adding one more stitch in between your increases as you progress through your rounds.

You will always make your crocodile stitch increases on your foundation rounds.

Now to relate this basic framework to making crocodile stitch increases in the round – where you see “increase” in the list above, replace with (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) and where you see “stitch”, replace with designated spot.

(Remember that designated spot is either in the middle of a scale or in between two scales)

Now that you have read the basics, have a look at this quick tutorial so it really sinks in…

What shape can you expect with crocodile stitch increases?

For projects you wish to start small and get bigger with each round, use what you have learned here to crochet crocodile stitch increases.

Remember crocodile stitch increases (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) take place on your foundation round. The scale rounds are worked as you normally would for crocheting the crocodile stitch in a flat piece.

When you crochet the crocodile stitch in rounds or flat pieces, the scales point downward.

One very popular example of what a project can look like when making crocodile stitch increases in the round is a mermaid tail cocoon. It stars small at the bottom, increases to a certain circumference and evens out.

A few more things to keep in mind

  • Your shape will be tubular rather than a flat circle.
  • Your foundation chain must be a multiple of 6.
  • For every 6 chains in your foundation, you will get one scale.

Now to give you a jump start on your next project with what you have just learned:

Start your first round, the foundation round by joining with your first ch. Ch 3 and dc in the same ch. Then ch 2 and sk 2 ch and make 2 dc in the next. Your repeat for the first round  no matter how big or small will always be (ch 2, sk 2, 2 dc in 3rd ch). When you have 2 ch remaining, ch 2, skip those two and join with a slst to the 3rd ch.

The second round will be your first scale round. No matter how big or small your circle, start by chaining 3. rotate your work and make 4 dc around the ch 3 from the previous round. Ch 1 and rotate the work the other way. Make 5 dc up the opposite dc. Ch 1 to finish it off. Now your repeat for this round is to skip the next group of 2 dc, rotate your work and make 5 dc down the first dc of the next group, ch 1 and rotate, and make 5 dc up the next dc of that same group. Ch 1. When you get to the end of your round, join with a slst to the 3rd ch of your first scale.

Ch 3 and dc in the same space (that’s your first to dc), ch 2 and 2 dc in the same spot. This group of stitches is your first increase. Always make a ch 2 in between your increases. Jump to the next designated spot and increase again. Ch 2 and repeat. At the end of the round, don’t forget to ch 2 and join with a slst to your 3rd ch. Then proceed with your scale round.

Work your scale round as you just did.

On your next foundation round you will increase at the start of the round (which will occur in between two scales). In the next designated spot (in the middle of a scale) you will not increase, so work 2 dc there.

Remember knowing how to work the crocodile stitch in a flat piece is necessary to fully understand this guide so if it’s not quite clicking yet, have a look at my step-by-step tutorial for the crocodile stitch here.

If you have additional questions, feel free to ask in the comment section below!

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The Basics of Crocodile Stitch Increases in the Round

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